3 Top Reasons to Hunt the Good Stuff

Why Your Attitude Matters

A few weeks ago I attended an all-day meeting for families with deployed soldiers. I was just thinking that what I learned there is very appropriate for Thanksgiving week, so this a reminder for me, but just in case it’s also helpful to you, I thought I’d share.

One of the presenters showed us this video of a father and son.

She used it as an example of hunting the good stuff. Sure, there are lots of obstacles in life. This boy wanted to run. He asked his father to help him, and he did. Can you think of a better example of not giving up a dream? If we hunt the good stuff, which is another way of saying look on the bright side, find what you can do instead of lamenting what you cannot, how much better will our lives be?

Here are three reasons it’s a good idea to hunt the good stuff.

1. If you hunt the good stuff, you’ll find it.

The Good Stuff!

photo by scribbletaylor

 

 

A defeatist attitude will only get you that, defeat. Looking for what’s good, beautiful, inspiring, however, can only make life better. Reminds me that we’ve been told this before:

 

 
Fix your thoughts on what is true, and honorable, and right, and pure, and lovely, and admirable. Think about things that are excellent and worthy of praise.–Philippians 4:8

And good attracts more good. Here’s what I mean. Say you’re having a bad day. You’ve misplaced your keys, you can’t find your favorite jeans so you had to settle for something else, you forgot your computer password, and the coffeemaker broke. Bad day, huh? Suppose you

Attitude is contagious

photo by ayadi othmane

decide instead to hunt the good stuff. You have a job. You have choices of clothing in your closet. You will save your password in the future, so you’ve learned a valuable lesson. These are SMALL things, but they add up. If you keep that bad attitude, guess what you’ll keep experiencing the rest of the day? But if you choose to look for the positive, guess what you’ll find then?

2. You’ll bring others with you.

Nothing is worse than a pity party. Sure, there is a lot in this world to be down about. There is a lot to scary you silly. But dwelling on those things causes not only anxiety, but also causes you to miss what’s truly good, not to mention the affect it has on everyone around you. Don’t be that Debbie Downer-type. Choose to encourage and inspire instead. (That’s what I would like to do, anyway. I’m trying!) And think about what a difference you could have in the lives of others if you hunt the good stuff more often than not. The people around you will begin to do the same thing. It works both ways, in my experience.

3. You will lessen the pain of the bad stuff.

And who doesn’t want that? Count your blessings. You have them, I’m sure. Have you counted them lately?

What are you most grateful for this Thanksgiving?

Blessings quote

photo by BK

My 2014 One Word

My One Word, Changing Your Life

My One WordHave you heard of this? Mike Ashcraft and Rachel Olsen wrote a book in which they explain how choosing one word to focus on for an entire year can change your life. The concept involves praying about what God wants to teach you, and that can be both scary and enlightening. Often the word you pick turns out to show you something you hadn’t considered before or you end up needing that message more than you could have ever imagined. You can read more about the book and the whole movement on this website.

My Words

PEACE

Photo: Muff McElfresh

In past years my words have been: Listen, Kindness, Peace, and Focus. Each year I have learned something new about myself and about where God is leading me by meditating on these words, seeking them out in the Bible, and praying over them. Sometimes they are a slap to the head. I’ll just let you imagine what that could mean! ;-)

Often women who choose a word will buy something with that word on it to help encourage them along the way. Usually, yeah, it’s jewelry. But also ornaments, coffee mugs…

I admit I’ve ordered something with my word on it. I’ve even created my own little pictures. They are reminders because I forget easily. The more reminders, the better. I made this little image to place on my desk because in 2014, I really needed to focus.

Cindy Thomson FOCUS

There have been so many distractions keeping me from making as much progress on my writing as I should. Some of them I created. Others have been beyond my control, but overall I just needed to focus and plow through.

How Is That Working?

Slowly. I am so happy God is patient with me. I would like to report that these words have changed me in spectacular ways, but the truth is, I have a long way to go. It’s a journey, and I have to keep reminding myself of that. I should not expect to have arrived. Because of that I’m a little reluctant to let my words go at the end of the year. I haven’t learned everything yet! That is why I’ve been keeping some of them together like this:

Cindy Thomson's My One Word

One thing I have learned from concentrating on one word for an entire year is that there is always something I have indeed learned. Maybe not perfectly, but it’s progress I might have missed had I not chosen to do this.

My 2015 Word

This came to me in church one Sunday, and then I heard the word somewhere right after. And I felt it in my heart.

SHARE

I realize that this word could have several meanings (as is the case with a lot of words) and I am not entirely sure what it means for me. My first thought had to do with mentoring since I’ve been seeing some changes in the way I’ve mentored in the past. My next thought was that I need to give away some of my writing, which feels just a bit painful right now because my writing income is virtually nil. Another thought is that if I don’t FOCUS in 2014 and get the current novel I’m working on finished, I won’t be able to SHARE in 2015.

But there are other things it could mean, such as speaking up, sharing my heart, my passion, the Gospel. I don’t know where it will lead in 2015, but I am sure God has a reason for asking me to focus on this word.

Have you chosen a word to focus on for a year? Are you considering doing so?

An Old Book Gets a New Life

Out of Print? Nope!

It happens, authors know it but dread it just the same. Not many books live forever. Or do they? That used to be the reality. When a book ceased to sell enough copies to satisfy the publisher, they put it out of print. An author can get the rights back (the rights to the story, not the cover or artwork) but in most cases that was the end of the line. Was. Now authors can easily reprint their books or put them out as ebooks, or both. With a fresh cover and more opportunities to reach readers through social media outlets, a book can live again.

My First Novel

Brigid of Ireland by Cindy ThomsonMy first published novel (I have several unpublished novels), was born into the market in the spring of 2006. I loved the process of writing this one, loved the Irish theme, loved imagining how a saint whom many believe never was a flesh-and-blood person could have actually existed and performed miraculous deeds. My publisher kept the book in print for seven years, not the norm for novels today. I actually earned royalties on this book. :)

When it went out of print, they allowed me to purchase the remaining stock. I still have a few boxes of the print version that I sell for just five bucks. But, in 2006 nobody was doing ebooks. Well, almost no one. Certainly not Monarch Books.

Introducing the 2014 Brigid

Brigid of Ireland by Cindy Thomson, ebookMy friend Deirdra Doan and I have bartered back and forth for editing (me) and artwork (her.) She has read this book and when it came time to create a new cover, she introduced me to her friend Kim Draper. I’m so glad she did! Kim created a lovely cover that I feel conveys the mystery and intrigue of the story.

I chose to publish the ebook on Kindle exclusively for now because most ebooks are sold on Amazon and even if a reader doesn’t have a Kindle, he or she can download the app on their computer for free and read it there. Here is the buy link.

Finding New Readers

That is my goal. I have heard from so many readers over the years who have enjoyed Brigid of Ireland, but of course there are many more who have never read it. I’m aware that some people prefer to read ebooks, and some for physical readers must read electronically. These days novels are published in both print and ebook formats (as are Grace’s Pictures and Annie’s Stories.) Some may wish to go back and read my first novel after they read those two, and now they can!

When Brigid of Ireland first came out, my publisher and I were thinking the book was for adults. But so very many young girls have enjoyed it, and there is nothing objectionable that should prevent them from doing so. I have signed the book for girls as young as nine! Of course, these girls are reading above their grade levels. I’m mentioning this in case there is anyone out there is looking for an adventure story set in ancient Ireland for a young reader. Maybe for a Christmas gift?

At one of my first book signings a young girl and her father paused at my table. The girl told her father she loved that book. I was amazed she had read it! She told me she read it for a book report for school. As a former teacher and a current mentor to some young writers, that really made my day. Well, my year at the least. Seeing as there is lots of action in the story, I think boys would like it too, but of course girls relate to Brigid who is a young woman in the story.

One of my earliest fans was the 14-year-old daughter of one my fellow novelists. When I sent my friend my new novel, her daughter snatched it from her to-be-read pile and read it first! I sent her a t-shirt. She is a young woman today, but this was her then.

Jenni, a fan of Brigid of Ireland by Cindy Thomson

Her review from back then:

Jenni’s Review

My name is Jenni and I’m a freshman at Concordia-Academy Bloomington (a Lutheran high school). I love to read and am currently working on writing a novel of my own. I like fencing and archery, playing flute, piano and guitar, and I hate geometry (but like algebra).

I took Brigid of Ireland from the stack of my mom’s books because the description on the back cover sounded interesting, and the cover was pretty. I liked the chapter openings with quotes – some Bible verses and some Celtic blessings or sayings.

But most of all, I absolutely loved the STORY of Brigid of Ireland. It has such a gripping plot, and is a great inspiration to my faith.

I’ve recommended it to all of my friends, knowing that they would love the suspense and heartbreak in it, as well as the spirituality. I admire Brigid’s strong faith throughout all her troubles. It gives me strength to go through tough things.

In addition to sharing this terrific book with adult friends, consider buying a copy for a daughter, student, niece, or other young woman in your life!

And Finally, Something for you!

Who would you recommend Brigid of Ireland to? Tell me and I’ll enter you in a drawing for your choice of either the ebook or the print version. Only comments on this blog post by Dec. 3, 2014 are eligible, and only if claimed by Dec. 31, 2014. Subscribe to the comments or check back to see if you’ve won.

Farewell to the Christian Writers Guild

Mentoring with the Christian Writers Guild

Christian Writers GuildI began mentoring the Guild several years ago, starting with the Pages program for kids when it was first introduced. I was thrilled to be included, and as a former teacher I loved that it gave me the chance to teach again. Over the years the Guild asked me to include Squires (for teens), several of the short adult courses, and in the last year the adult courses referred to as Apprentice and Journeyman Fiction. I also did a couple of critiques, attended the Writing for the Soul conference to take appointments as a mentor, and judged the first round of The First Novel Contest for several years. Besides my students, which I enjoyed walking through these courses, I met other mentors and employees of the Guild that I count among my friends. Wonderful people.

Jerry JenkinsJerry Jenkins

I heard Jerry relate his reasons for buying the Guild in 2001 many times at conferences and meetings we had in Colorado. He believed (and I’m sure he still does) that Christian writers ought be just as good or better than mainstream writers. We should represent Christ by writing with excellence. And to this end he wanted to train Christian writers and the Guild was the way to do that, a means to give back. He gave of his time and his resources. If anyone thinks it was a money maker, they’re wrong.

Anyone who has witnessed his “thick-skinned critiques” understands how much he cared about teaching writers. He even chose carefully each mentor and employee of the Guild. But as time marched on, he wanted to focus on his family and his own novel writing. The time had come to close the doors. Some have reported that he did this “suddenly” but that’s not true. The man doesn’t make impulsive decisions. Not that I’ve witnessed anyway. It was a process.

One thing I learned over the years about the man is that he’s a perfectionist, but a kind one. Did you know he wears an atomic watch so that he’ll always know the exact time? When we had mentor meetings he used it to make sure we started each session on time. So it makes sense that he is now personally making sure the students and members currently enrolled in the Guild finish and receive all they’ve been promised. And the mentors still get paid for the work they have left to do. He is honorable. Make no mistake.

Endings and Beginnings

I hate saying good-bye to an organization that has done so much so well. But an ending creates the opportunity for something else to commence. I am open to that. I’ll be mentoring in other ways, including offering short critiques that interested writers can sign up for right here on my site. But I’m still just a wee bit sad.

What endings have you experienced that ended up opening new doors? Please share!

Cooking Up Some Family History!

This article first appeared in Discovering Family History Magazine, July/August 2008. No copying without the author’s permission is permitted.

Campton, KY church dinnerLinking Food to Memories

Scientists say that smell is the sense most tied to memory, and , of course, taste is linked. Think of your strongest childhood memories. Pancakes at Grandma’s? A hotdog at a baseball game? The smell of popcorn at a movie theater? The grape Popsicle you had after the doctor gave you stitches? We have such powerful memories tied to what we eat and drink, so it’s logical that our ancestors did also. Many people preserved their recipes and handed them down. Food, like many other factors of everyday life, helps to define people. Discovering family recipes is one way to find out who our ancestors were both economically and socially.

If You Don’t Have the Family Cookbook

If you don’t have a cookbook lovingly handed down to you, there are still ways to learn about what your ancestors ate. Once you find the recipes, you might even want to recreate some of them for a full sensory experience. At the Family Web Cafe, at http://www.familywebcafe.com, you can try some ethnic recipes.

Examples of Ethnic Foods to Try

Irish? Try shepherd’s pie with ground beef, mashed potatoes and cheese. Greek? Souvlaki might satisfy with its marinated meat, Greek olives and feta cheese. Those with Italian ancestry might like to try their hand at making stromboli. Can’t you just smell those amazing dishes right now?

Finding Historical Cookbooks

Early settlers to North America may have brought ingredients and recipes with them, but these were soon adapted to the food supply at hand. Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook Project. at http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/, is one source for finding these recipes. The project, run by Michigan State University, is an online collection of cookbooks dating from the late 18th century to the early 20th century. The advanced search allows you to find regional and ethnic recipes. Click on “Browse the Collection”, then “By Interest”. Chances are, if your ancestors lived in the same region where these recipes came from, they ate similar things.

What Food Can Tell You

You can learn about the manners, customs and domestic arts of a group of people just by reading a few of these books. For instance, in Mary At the Farm and Book of Recipes Complied During Her Visit Among the “Pennsylvania Germans’, by Edith M. Thomas, you can learn how to preserve yellow ground cherries, make shoo-fly pie, brod knodel and other culinary delights. The book is written in narrative form and gives good insight into the everyday life of the Pennsylvania Dutch. In The Great Western Cook Book, or Table Receipts, Adapted to Western Housewifery by Angelina Maria Collins you can learn how to make veal in “western fashion” and apple pie in a pot.

But these cookbooks offer more than just recipes. There is a discussion in Mary At the Farm about women’s suffrage, both from an older woman’s view who saw no need for women to vote, and from a younger woman’s view who thought it was essential. In Estelle Woods Wilcox’s Buckeye Cookery, And Practical Housekeeping: Complied From Original Recipes, you can learn how to soften well water for washing clothes by using ashes. You never know what you’ll find in these “cookbooks”!

A search in your local library may turn up some interesting cookbooks, both regionally and nationally distributed. Sometimes the old cookbooks are reprinted and historical matter is inserted. Often cookbooks are compiled as fundraisers for churches and other groups.

Preserving Your Own Family Recipes

family cookbook

My mom’s self-produced family cookbook

While you’re digging around for recipes from past generations, don’t forget to preserve those you already have. Here is a great resource to help you with cookbook publishing: [Link from the article is broken. Perhaps you’d like to share one?]

With the popularity of microwave dinners and fast food, some of these family recipes, and the great memories that accompany them, might be lost if you don’t record them. Chances are the smell and taste of bite-sized pizzas will not be memorable enough to evoke emotions the way Christmas plum pudding or fresh baked Johnny Cakes can.

Win The Wizard of OZ Book!

Win a Free Book!

I’ve heard the comment many times from people who’ve read Annie’s Stories: “I’ve never read the original book.” So I thought I’d run a giveaway for a reprint of the 1900 book by L. Frank Baum. There are several ways to enter (see below.)

Please share with everyone you think might be interested.

Wonderful Wizard of Oz Baum

a Rafflecopter giveaway

All Saints

All Saints Sunday

Clonfert and RememberingYesterday the church calendar marked All Saints Day. I remember it growing up as a day when my church would read the names of all the members who have passed away and toll a bell with each name. (I don’t think my current church does that, but many traditional observances seem to be falling away.)

It was a somber tradition, as all moments of remembrance tend to be. It was an observance I never cared for. Too sad. But it’s not truly meant to be depressing. Remembering and honoring are important things to do if we are to realize our place in this world.

 

The Communion of Saints

Another tradition that is often overlooked is the practice of reciting in a corporate manner, what we as Christian people of the church believe. Spot the word “saints” below:

The Apostles’ Creed

I believe in God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth.

And in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord; who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Clonmacnoise from Author Cindy ThomsonVirgin Mary; suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried; He descended into hell; the third day He rose again from the dead; He ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty; from thence He shall come to judge the quick and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Ghost; the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints; the forgiveness of sins; the resurrection of the body; and the life everlasting. Amen.

The communion of saints. There is the Lord’s Supper, which is called Communion, but I think this refers to Webster’s definition: an act or instance of sharing. Believers are called saints, both those living and deceased. All Saints Day is a communion, a sharing. A bond between those who are together in Christ.

Saints Leading the Way

We celebrate today the solemnity of All Saints. This invites us to turn our gaze to the immense multitude of those who have already reached the blessed land, and points us on the path that will lead us to that destination.
Pope John Paul II, All Saints’ Day 2003

Ballintoy Church from author Cindy Thomson“Points us on the path.”–That’s something that has resonated with me ever since I started writing. When you think of the numbers of people who have lived on the earth before us, you have to believe they learned a thing or two about going through life that we could benefit from. Thankfully, many taught and wrote and passed that legacy down to us.

 

Who is a saint (well known or not) that you have learned from?

Say But Little

Gaelic proverb

On the wall of the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, Edinburgh. Photo by Beth

Making Words Count

I came across a photograph of this sign in a book I own and I was thinking it’s a fitting sentiment for lawmakers and politicians. I’m sure it’s the upcoming election that made me realize that. But as is so often the case with things I hear, I tend to think they are for someone else. I remember a minister who used to complain about folks who would come up to him after services and say they wished their son, or uncle, or wife, or husband should have been there to hear that sermon. It drove him nuts because he believed the people who needed to hear it were the ones sitting in the pews and they didn’t even realize it. So, I’m sure this proverb is for me too. Especially since I write. I need to make sure I use the right number of words to “say it well.”

Cindy Thomson's books

Books I’ve written or contributed to.

Consider Your Words Carefully

It’s so easy to say the first thing that comes to mind. I try not to do that. In a moment of high anxiety I often do and regret it later. But mostly I wait before I speak, or before I act, because…you can’t take it back, can you? You can apologize for your words but they remain suspended in that conversation. (Or forever on the Internet!) ;-)

Words Have Power

Thomson Family BookI strongly believe that. As a Christian, I believe the words in the Bible are living and filled with power and meaning. But other words, in other kinds of books and publications, have power as well. For instance, think about how the public was persuaded to fight for independence from England. There were many people who did not feel compelled to wage war. They were convinced. With words. Sometimes with words that were exaggerated and emotionally charged, such as how an altercation in Boston became a massacre. Not that the colonies shouldn’t have revolted. I’m glad we won independence. I’m just saying words, more than anything else, got that war started.

Words have power to soothe as well. That’s why we send cards when someone dies or is sick or sad. The words “I love you” and “I’m sorry” are extremely important words in our relationships.

And who doesn’t feel moved by beautifully written words such as these:

“Through the opening of the mouth, we bring out sounds from the mountain beneath our soul. These sounds are words. The world is full of words. There are so many talking all the time, loudly, quietly, in rooms, on streets, on television, on radio, in the paper, in books. The noise of words keeps what we call the world there for us…Yet the uttering of the word reveals how each of us relentlessly creates. Everyone is an artist. Each person brings sound out of silence and coaxes the invisible to become visible.”~From Anam Cara, A Book of Celtic Wisdom by John O’Donohue

A Couple of Notes About My Words

Cindy Thomson's Newsletter SignupJust wanted to alert you to a couple of things. One is that my monthly newsletter will be going out soon and if you haven’t signed up look for the form to right of this post. I’ve got a few things to share that subscribers hear first, and sometimes some giveaways as well.

And finally I wanted to alert you that if you have an ereader or know someone who does, or would like to read on your computer via the free Kindle ap, Annie’s Stories is only $2.99 through tomorrow, November 1. Here is the link.Annie's Stories by Cindy Thomson

I hope you enjoy some good words this weekend. Are you listening to something or reading something you’d like to share? Please leave a comment. I will be listening to a Yellow Ribbon event held for the families of my son’s National Guard unit, and hopefully reading the books I’ve started. (It’s leaf-racking season too, but I’ll do my best to get a few words in–writing a few too, hopefully!) If you’d like to see what I’m reading on Goodreads, go here.

C’mon People Now, Smile on Your Brother

In light of being called a bigot for writing about the Scots Irish, I decided to reflect on the attitude held by some of those whose ancestors never left the homeland toward those of us living in the immigrant melting pot called America.

Students at Ellis IslandLabeling our Ancestry

If your ancestors have lived in a country or region for hundreds of years, you might feel a sense of pride in your heritage. You might resent others who claim that heritage but who were never born in your country, but if you do, you are surely short-sighted, or at least, uninformed. America was populated for the most part by people who came from other countries. Some recently, but many from the 18th century to the massive immigration period of the 19th century. That means we have a short past on the North American continent and are likely to identify with the countries from which our ancestors came. Immigrants

Some like to call themselves Irish, English, Italian, or whatever, but what they really mean is they have roots in those countries. If they themselves were born in America, they are American. They might say they are Irish-American, African-American, or Chinese-American, but if they do, they are only referring to the land where their ancestors were born. This is not meant to defame any native born people. I wish people would not take offense. (Personally, I only say I’m American or sometimes American with Irish roots, or Scots-Irish roots, or Welsh roots, because I can positively trace my ancestors to those countries.)

What This Labeling Really Means

Irish famine immigrantsIt means we appreciate the sacrifices those ancestors made. It means we respect their decision and we understand how much they missed the land of their birth. But perhaps even more important, it means we recognize there was family left behind. Sometimes we long to reconnect what our ancestor was forced to sever, even if we can only do it in a small way.

This sums that up so well: Letter to My Irish Ancestor

What the Labeling Does NOT Mean

Flag of the 89th OVI Civil WarIt does not mean we aren’t proud to be Americans. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that. Ever. We live in the land of the home and the brave, the land so many people come to to seek freedom, the country so many people today depend upon to protect democracy or to bring humanitarian relief all over the world.

American Flag

Lee Coursey

We ARE Americans, first and foremost. But to ignore where our ancestors came from would be to ignore part of ourselves. Some do, of course. They are not interested in genealogy. But many, many others care very much.

We Are Family

Truly the entire human race is connected somewhere along the way. Who can truly say he/she is native? People have moved about since the beginning of time. Can anyone truly hold on to his/her ancestry and say it only belongs to those currently living in a particular country? I don’t think so. And if you think so, I say let’s compare DNA. Let’s start living as though we are all long-lost cousins, because in fact, we are.81fa7-congregationpast350

That’s my view.

Getting Out There to Learn About the Scots-Irish

Part Two from Finding Help With Your Scots-Irish Line originally appearing in Tracing Your Irish Roots, Moorshead Magazines Ltd., 2012 ©Cindy Thomson.

 How Ireland Can Help Researchers

Family Tree. Tracing your Scots-Irish roots.Tracing a family line back as far as the 17th century might seem daunting, but records do exist. And where better to get help and learn about this group’s culture than a society established for that purpose?

A special school for genealogists researching Northern Ireland roots is offered in conjunction with several Northern Ireland agencies, such as the Ulster Historical Foundation; the University of Ulster; Centre for Migration Studies at the Ulster American Folk Park in Omagh, County Tyrone; and local historical societies. Past participants came from the United States, Canada, New Zealand, The Republic of Ireland, and Northern Ireland, to enjoy a holiday researching with the help of local experts. Billed as “An Activity Holiday with a Difference”, the program stretches over a week and involves local history lectures, research visits to the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, and visits to historical sites. It is these visits to important sites within the homeland of our ancestors that help make this school intriguing to many, but the value of having access to local historians and genealogists should not be underestimated.

Previous students have enjoyed touring Belfast City Hall and Parliament Buildings. They

Tracing Your Scots-Irish Roots, Cindy Thomson

Ulster American Folk Park

also visited historical locations in the countryside, such as Sentry Hill House, and the Ulster American Folk Park and Centre for Migration Studies at Omagh. The Duke of Abercorn gave a personal tour of his home at Barons Court.

[Since this article appeared, I’m not sure the school is still running. But for research assistance options, check this site.]

One benefit is that because this effort is being supported by the University of Ulster, registrants will have access to that university’s library and electronic resources for genealogy research.

Short of making the trip, there are some materials available that can aid your research. Researching Scots-Irish Ancestors by William Roulston, published by the Ulster Historical Foundation, 2005, is said to be the first comprehensive guide for family historians searching for ancestors in 17th and 18th century Ulster.Researching Scots-Irish Ancestors

The society also offers two pocket histories/fold out maps entitled “The Scots in Ulster Surname Map and Pocket History” and “The Plantation of Ulster: The story of the Scots, 1610-1630.” You can order these for only the cost of postage and handling through these links: Surname Map    Plantation of Ulster

An online resource worth plugging your surname into is the Scots in Ulster. I found several hits for Thomson in this database, which could provide some clues for own research.

Closer to Home

In America, researchers should not overlook local organizations where help may be found, such as The Ulster-Scots Society of America, whose stated purpose reads: “The Ulster-Scots Society of America is primarily an educational and social organization committed to the promotion of the Ulster-Scots history and heritage, especially as it pertains to the nearly quarter of a million immigrants who left the north of Ireland (Ulster) during the 18th century and settled in America (often referred to as: The Great Migration).”

The Scotch-Irish Society of the United States of America is another group to check into. From their website: “The Scotch-Irish Society of the United States of America was founded to promote and preserve Scotch-Irish history and culture of America’s Scotch-Irish heritage and to keep alive the esprit de corps of the Scotch-Irish people. Membership in the Society is available to United States citizens, and to legal permanent residents of the United States, who are of Scotch-Irish descent.” The Center publishes issues of the Journal of Scotch-Irish Studies.

[I had more links in the article, but since links are hard to keep up to date, I won’t repeat them all here. If you know of any, please leave them in the comments. And by the way, did anyone else find it amusing that the Scotch-Irish Society used French to describe themselves, or is it just me?]

Tom&Cindy Thomson, Ireland 2010

Our 2010 trip to Ireland, taken at Inch Abbey, County Down, Northern Ireland.

These are just some of the resources available, but by consulting those who have gathered together to promote research and understanding of the Scots-Irish people, you will find like-minded people who can help you along your research journey.