Tag Archives: Annie’s Stories

Bonus Unpublished Material!

Get a bonus reading from Annie's Stories!Now subscribers to my newsletter can get a bonus, not published, chapter that was cut from Annie’s Stories. FREE! A bit more insight into what Annie was thinking and hoping for when she first came to America.

Sign up for my newsletter, or remind me that you are already signed up, and I will send it to you. The form is on the right hand side of this page. That’s all there is to it!

 

Birth Order and Fictional Characters

My Ellis Island Characters

So far I’ve avoided birth order with my series, pretty much anyway. Grace McCaffery was an only child until she was an adult. Of course, she did work as a nanny for four children, so there was some sibling rivalry there that she had to work to understand, but basically she was an only child.Grace's Pictures by Cindy Thomson

And then Annie Gallagher. She was only child. Her mother died after Annie was born and her father never remarried. She had a special relationship with her father, very different than Grace’s experience.

Annie's Stories by Cindy Thomson

And now Sofia’s Tune. She is the oldest of five children, plus their entire neighborhood consists of people who lived near each other back in Italy. She feels protective, impatient, and sometimes ignored–all within her family unit. Is she a typical oldest child? Yes and no.

Friends as Family

You may have noticed if you’ve read these books, but friends become family as these immigrants have to redefine their lives. Historically, the people who came through Ellis Island often left their families on the other side of the Atlantic. They built new family units.

Why Ellis Island immigrants had to create new families. Click To Tweet

This idea intrigues me. I want to know, do you count some friends as family?

1934Siblings in Fiction

227571Countless novels have featured siblings or explored birth order and relationships. Little Women, for instance or Peace Like a River, just to name two. Which are your favorites?

Tell me your favorite novels exploring sibling relationships. #booktalk #bloggingbooks Click To Tweet

 

Win The Wizard of OZ Book!

Win a Free Book!

I’ve heard the comment many times from people who’ve read Annie’s Stories: “I’ve never read the original book.” So I thought I’d run a giveaway for a reprint of the 1900 book by L. Frank Baum. There are several ways to enter (see below.)

Please share with everyone you think might be interested.

Wonderful Wizard of Oz Baum

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Say But Little

Gaelic proverb

On the wall of the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, Edinburgh. Photo by Beth

Making Words Count

I came across a photograph of this sign in a book I own and I was thinking it’s a fitting sentiment for lawmakers and politicians. I’m sure it’s the upcoming election that made me realize that. But as is so often the case with things I hear, I tend to think they are for someone else. I remember a minister who used to complain about folks who would come up to him after services and say they wished their son, or uncle, or wife, or husband should have been there to hear that sermon. It drove him nuts because he believed the people who needed to hear it were the ones sitting in the pews and they didn’t even realize it. So, I’m sure this proverb is for me too. Especially since I write. I need to make sure I use the right number of words to “say it well.”

Cindy Thomson's books

Books I’ve written or contributed to.

Consider Your Words Carefully

It’s so easy to say the first thing that comes to mind. I try not to do that. In a moment of high anxiety I often do and regret it later. But mostly I wait before I speak, or before I act, because…you can’t take it back, can you? You can apologize for your words but they remain suspended in that conversation. (Or forever on the Internet!) 😉

Words Have Power

Thomson Family BookI strongly believe that. As a Christian, I believe the words in the Bible are living and filled with power and meaning. But other words, in other kinds of books and publications, have power as well. For instance, think about how the public was persuaded to fight for independence from England. There were many people who did not feel compelled to wage war. They were convinced. With words. Sometimes with words that were exaggerated and emotionally charged, such as how an altercation in Boston became a massacre. Not that the colonies shouldn’t have revolted. I’m glad we won independence. I’m just saying words, more than anything else, got that war started.

Words have power to soothe as well. That’s why we send cards when someone dies or is sick or sad. The words “I love you” and “I’m sorry” are extremely important words in our relationships.

And who doesn’t feel moved by beautifully written words such as these:

“Through the opening of the mouth, we bring out sounds from the mountain beneath our soul. These sounds are words. The world is full of words. There are so many talking all the time, loudly, quietly, in rooms, on streets, on television, on radio, in the paper, in books. The noise of words keeps what we call the world there for us…Yet the uttering of the word reveals how each of us relentlessly creates. Everyone is an artist. Each person brings sound out of silence and coaxes the invisible to become visible.”~From Anam Cara, A Book of Celtic Wisdom by John O’Donohue

A Couple of Notes About My Words

Cindy Thomson's Newsletter SignupJust wanted to alert you to a couple of things. One is that my monthly newsletter will be going out soon and if you haven’t signed up look for the form to right of this post. I’ve got a few things to share that subscribers hear first, and sometimes some giveaways as well.

And finally I wanted to alert you that if you have an ereader or know someone who does, or would like to read on your computer via the free Kindle ap, Annie’s Stories is only $2.99 through tomorrow, November 1. Here is the link.Annie's Stories by Cindy Thomson

I hope you enjoy some good words this weekend. Are you listening to something or reading something you’d like to share? Please leave a comment. I will be listening to a Yellow Ribbon event held for the families of my son’s National Guard unit, and hopefully reading the books I’ve started. (It’s leaf-racking season too, but I’ll do my best to get a few words in–writing a few too, hopefully!) If you’d like to see what I’m reading on Goodreads, go here.

Reacting to Feedback

Annie's Stories by Cindy ThomsonRight off the top let me say this is not about negative feedback. There will always be people who will not get my work. (Thanks to author Susan Meissner for teaching me that.) Negative reviews are part of the business and to be expected. But that is not to say there isn’t something to be learned from reading reviews, both positive and not so great.

You Can Say That Again

I look for reoccurring statements and think about them. Is there something there I should learn from? Maybe, maybe not so much. But, yeah. Probably there is, whether I want to admit it or not.

For instance. Many reviewers have said my novels are a bit slow. That did not bother some. It did others. Reading is so very subjective. Perhaps there is something I could do in future stories to speed up the action a bit, but only a bit. I’m not going to try to start writing thrillers that hurl you into the action. One of my writer friends noted a trend of writers beginning with an action scene that ultimately had nothing to do with the novel’s plot. I’ve been taught, by wonderful editors, that every single scene needs to matter. The scenes move the story forward.

Not a Kissy-Kissy Story

(Not that there’s anything wrong with that!)

Talking about romance in novels

shutterpa via Flickr

What I keep reading over and over again is that the romance in my books unfolds slowly, that the books are low-romance, and that it makes sense that way. Better I let the reviewers express this:

“Thomson’s story development is refreshing in that Thomson knows how to develop relationships slowly while keeping the action moving. The romance feels authentic and the story keeps you hooked with suspense, drama and emotion.”

“The story wasn’t just a love story, but about self discovery, forgiveness, and family. ”

“And while this story does include a romance, it is not of the highly emotional variety. The two characters have only brief meetings, and it takes a while for them to forget the mistakes and hurts of their past enough to face the future. Personally, I found it refreshing to read a love story that, while sweet, was also more realistic that most.”

“…sweet story with a very light romantic bent to it.”

“The romance feels authentic and the story keeps you hooked with suspense, drama and emotion.”

“Cindy has a way of writing characters that are totally believable. There is a sweet love story in the novel…”

So, I call it romance “light.”

My Voice, My Stories

When I finished this story my agent said, “Please tell me there is romance in this story.” There is, although it may not be typical. I prefer to call it a love story, and like many of my readers are saying, the romance flows at a rate that is believable for these characters. How can anyone who has trust issues due to what they’ve been through fling themselves into a romantic relationship. I just could not make Annie do that, although she does see something of her father in Stephen, something that is appealing.

So what do you think? You can voice your opinion. Click here!