Celtic Beginnings: All Saints Day

Photo by Kilian Kremer on Unsplash

All Hallows Eve

Halloween is hugely celebrated in the US, but its roots can be found in Ireland. You may have seen several articles about this on Facebook and elsewhere leading up to October 31. I know I have. Here’s a good one to check out on the Irish American Mom website.

There is a harvest aspect to the Celtic festival, but also a celebration of the dead. All Hallows or All Saints became the Christian church’s All Saints Day.

All Saints Day

Photo by Léa V on Unsplash

A day to remember all those believers who have gone to their eternal rest. A day to remember that those who have gone before us lead us on our way. This is important to me. It’s the theme of all my historical writing. It’s the theme of a Bible verse that has inspired me:

This is what the LORD says: “Stop at the crossroads and look around. Ask for the old, godly way, and walk in it. Travel its path, and you will find rest for your souls. ~Jeremiah 6:16 NLT

And So I Pause

…to consider the significance of this day. Admittedly it’s something we do think about as we get older. More and more people we have known, those who have raised us, those who have been spiritual mentors, have passed on. That’s fitting, but truly everyone should think about those saints in heaven, see what there is to be learned from their lives, and celebrate that they ran the good race and now are made perfect.

The photo below spoke to me. It reminds me of the empty seats at my church where a saint once sat but has now gone on to new life. I, like the woman here, am left to carry on. I know I can’t fill their shoes (you may feel the same way about those you are missing) but I must do my best, with God’s help.

Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

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